美国加州大学盖泽尔图书馆

发表于2014-11-14     8372人浏览     77人跟帖     总热度:2579  

  • 文件格式:ZIP
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The library of university of California theodor seuss geisel

设计方:William L. Pereira & Associates

位置:美国

分类:文化建筑

内容:实景照片

建筑设计负责人:William Pereira

图片:12张

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为了纪念在儿童文学上做出杰出贡献的作家: Dr. Seuss ( Theodor Seuss Geisel 西奥多•苏斯•盖泽尔),加利福尼亚大学圣地亚哥分校图书馆在1995年正式改名为盖泽尔图书馆,这座造型独特的八层图书馆由建筑师 William Pereira设计于1960年,座落于峡谷之上。它在多部科幻电影、科幻故事和科幻小说中曾经出现过。

在这栋图书馆大楼中,4楼到8楼市图书馆的收藏室和研究室,而1楼和2楼则是服务柜台和工作区。这个图书馆的外形早在20世纪60年代中后期就被设计师想到了,原设计是一个设立在校园中心的一个8层建筑,较低的两层形成建筑的底座,加强整个建筑的视觉。目前,该建筑已经成为了加州大学圣地亚哥分校,甚至是圣地亚哥的一个视觉符号。

译者: 艾比

The alien form of the Geisel Library at the University of California, San Diego seems befitting of a backdrop from a science fiction movie. The building occupies a fascinating nexus between brutalism and futurism that its architect, William Pereira, intrepidly pursued throughout his career. With its strong concrete piers and hovering glassy enclosures, the library beautifully occupies an ambiguous state between massiveness and levitation, as if the upper stories have only just been set into their base and can be lifted back out at any moment. The tension between these two conditions gives the library an otherworldly appearance and provides a startling statement about the generative and imaginative power of the architect.

While he is often stylized as one of the more under-appreciated shapers of 20th century American architecture, Pereira enjoyed tremendous influence throughout the United States in the 1960s and 1970s. In 1965, he was awarded the commission to build the library at UCSD due in part to his impressive history of eye-catching and inventive designs. The building was to be located at geometric center of the San Diego campus at the crest of a small canyon, arguably the university’s most prominent piece of real estate. The design needed to be a visually robust statement worthy of the location, and Pereira seemed to be the right man for the job.

To develop the schematic design for the library, Pereira analyzed and categorized dozens of university libraries by their massing, circulation, and programmatic arrangements. He theorized about which forms were more effective than others at providing certain functions that he valued, such as daylight in the stacks, the ability to browse the shelves, and the potential for future expansion.

Using rudimentary diagrams as the basis of his design, he theorized that partially submerging the library would allow maximum potential for expansion and would bury the elements of the library that were not necessary above ground. For the aboveground portion, he wanted access to emanate from a singular point at the ground level, with a central core connecting the different floors. The most logical shape for a library, he concluded, would therefore be a sphere, which could maximize daylight to the floors, provide a variety of flexible floor arrangements, and maintain an ideal central circulation system. Even though the spherical exterior was ultimately abandoned for this project, Periera preserved the underlying concept of a large middle floor with tapered, smaller floors below and above.

The resulting building is an eight-story structure with two submerged floors and six floors of varying sizes above ground level. The widest of the above ground levels occurs at the sixth floor, which is over two hundred feet wide. A solid core containing the stairs, elevators, and mechanical shafts runs throughout the building. While the “main” level is considered the first submerged level, the experiential center of the building is immediately above it at the forum level, where the building is at its thinnest and the massive overhangs of the floors above cast a heavy shadow over the outdoor plaza.

The tapered cantilevers above the plaza are supported by a simple but ingenious structural system consisting of sixteen massive concrete piers that rise out of the forum level and branch outward at 45-degree angles. They extend past the full width of the sixth floor and bridge the jagged edges of the enclosed spaces with a continuous, diagonal motion that meets the floor plates at their bottom edge. To prevent them from buckling outward under the stress transferred to them by the floors, each pier is connected to its opposite by over three hundred quarter-inch steel tie rods that counteract the gravitational forces.

At each aboveground level, giant sheets of plate glass coated in anodized aluminum provide light to the reading spaces and stacks within. The treatment of the windows allows them to reflect and sometimes blend in perfectly with the sky behind it. The color of the glass oscillates between dull grays, vibrant blues, and fiery yellows depending on the weather and time of day, creating a dynamic and ever-changing appearance. The treatment also allows the vast expanses of glass—38,000 square feet in all—to dematerialize into the sky, intensifying the levitating effect created by the unconventional configuration of the building.

As an icon of brutalism, the library has at times been subjected to the vitriolic criticism so commonly associated with the movement, even being named to a Reuters list of the “Top 10 Ugly Buildings to Visit.” [1] However, while it seems obvious that the building belongs squarely within the brutalist tradition, the original design actually called for a modernist construction made entirely out of steel and glass. While this seems unconscionable given the severe character of the existing building, it wasn’t until cost-cutting measures were introduced that the structure was re-designed with concrete and re-located to the outside of the building. The success of the articulate brutalist language present in the current design, which incorporates Breuer-like flares at the bases of the piers and an intricate lattice system on the underside of the floor plates, reveals a remarkable material and syntactic versatility on the part of the architect.

Although the project may be misunderstood, for the vast majority of the UCSD community, the library is a cherished icon and the symbol of the campus. It is featured prominently on university recruiting materials, and was even briefly incorporated into the university’s logo. In 1995, the library was renamed in honor of Audrey Geisel and Theodor Seuss Geisel, better known as “Dr. Seuss,” following a $20 million gift from their estate and the contents of their archives. And while the library may resemble nothing of colorful, lyrical architecture of the Who Houses, Pereira’s design expresses the same imaginative impulse that made so many people fall in love with the library’s new namesake.

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  • 文件大小:10.74KB
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 发表于2014-11-17   |  只看该作者      

2

美国加州大学盖泽尔图书馆平面图

 发表于2014-11-17   |  只看该作者      

3

不错的作品,值得借鉴和拥有!谢谢楼主分享!
发帖是一种享受,看贴是一种收获,跟帖是一种美德,回帖是一种尊重 ! 加热和收藏也更是一种尊重!

 发表于2014-11-17   |  只看该作者      

4

不得不说,能在上世纪60年代设计出这样的作品实属不易,即便现在看来也很前卫,很符合结构美学的特点

 发表于2014-11-17   |  只看该作者      

5

非常好的作品,值得学习。

 发表于2014-11-17   |  只看该作者      

6

非常高的设计作品,值得学习和借鉴。

 发表于2014-11-17   |  只看该作者      

7

非常有想法的建筑、一个不一样的建筑、值得收藏

 发表于2014-11-17   |  只看该作者      

8

收藏,值得去学习学习

 发表于2014-11-17   |  只看该作者      

9

初次见到,感觉就像一朵花般盛开

 发表于2014-11-17   |  只看该作者      

10

加强整个建筑的视觉,这点确实做到了

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